Tag Archives: Pitch Count Rule

Goedde sharing his knowledge at Evansville Central

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By STEVE KRAH

http://www.IndianaRBI.com

Mike Goedde has coached collegians and now leads high schoolers.

“(The difference in) physical skills are obvious,” says Goedde. “With high school players, you have to be more patient. You know you’re going to have more physical and mental errors. You just try to keep them to a minimum.”

Goedde, 55, is a former University of Southern Indiana head coach (1994-2006) who served two stints as University of Evansville pitching coach (1986-88, 1990-93), one year as an Evansville Harrison High School assistant (2010) and is now in his seventh season as head coach at Evansville Central High School.

The 1980 Evansville Mater Dei High School graduate pitched three seasons for University of Evansville coach Jim Brownlee and three seasons in the Cincinnati Reds organization (1983-85).

When the playing career ended, Brownlee gave Goedde a chance to coach.

“He was a huge influence on the field and a huge influence off the field,” says Goedde. “He taught me a lot of things instead of just baseball.

“There’s guys out there that need chances and I can provide those as well.”

Goedde decided to get his teaching license so he could teach baseball and life lessons. He eventually landed at Central for the 2011 season.

“We teach more than just the X’s and O’s,” says Goedde as he prepared the Bears for the Class 4A Evansville Reitz Sectional. “The kids are all ears. Very few of them tune you out. They’re eager to learn.”

With his background, Goedde is hands-on with his pitchers.

“We develop them to win with their fastball,” says Goedde. “I’m not a big fan of a lot of junk (or breaking pitches). Locating the fastball is the most important thing.”

That is the case with his current crop of hurlers and that was true when he coached future big league right-hander Andy Benes at U of E. He was taken first overall by the San Diego Padres in the 1988 Major League Baseball First-Year Player Draft and went on to win 155 MLB games in 14 seasons with the Padres, Seattle Mariners, St. Louis Cardinals and Arizona Diamondbacks.

“He realized what he was capable of doing and developed it,” says Goedde of the former Central star who is enshrined in the Indiana High School Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame. “Not everybody does that. He’s a very unique player and person.”

Benes resides in St. Louis but was back in the Pocket City this spring for a special occasion.

This spring, Central named its playing facility in honor of the man who built it — IHSBCA Hall of Famer Paul Gries. His 1987 team was a state runner-up the Hall of Famer Ken Schreiber’s LaPorte national champions.

While Goedde never played for or coached with Gries, who retired after the 2001 season, he commends the man.

“The more I coach high school players, the more I admire what he was able to do,” says Goedde. “He was known for developing a family atmosphere.”

Helping Goedde guide the program in 2017 are assistant coaches Robbie Frank, Chris Chitwood and Dave Pfetscher at the varsity level, Jon Pfetscher, Ryan Causey and Charlie Causey with junior varsity and Kevin Kolb and Gary Masterson with the freshmen.

The JV and freshmen have a different schedule from the Bears varsity. Goedde generally keeps 38 to 40 players in the program each season.

The spring, the IHSAA adopted pitch count rules (1 to 35 pitches requires 0 days rest; 36 to 60 requires 1 day; 61 to 80 requires 2 days; 81 to 100 requires 3 days; and 101 to 120 requires 4 days).

“I think it’s a great rule,” says Goedde. “It’s being done for all for the right reasons and right purposes.

“It’s something to make people aware of some guidelines.”

Through games played May 18, the Bears had one pitcher come close to the limit, tossing 119 pitches in a complete game.

While pitch count numbers can become a part of strategy, Goedde is of a mind that coaches are coached on their own pitchers more than opponents.

“As time goes on, they’ll figure out ways to get the opposing kid’s count,” says Goedde. “It’s tough to convince (hitters) to drive up the pitch count.”

The Central Bears play in the Southern Indiana Athletic Conference (along with Castle, Evansville Bosse, Evansville Reitz, Evansville Harrison, Evansville Mater Dei, Evansville North and Evansville Memorial).

SIAC schools play each other once a week in a two-game home-and-home series, making it possible for teams to use their top starting pitchers in conference games.

Central players come from area Little League, Babe Ruth and travel programs. In the spring, seventh and eighth graders on their way to Central play Cub baseball.

MIKEGOEDDE

Mike Goedde is in his seventh season as head baseball coach at Evansville Central High School. He is a former head coach at the University of Southern Indiana and served two stints as pitching coach at the University of Evansville and one as an assistant at Evansville Harrison High School.

Kauffman to lead Fairfield program for ’18 season

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By STEVE KRAH

http://www.IndianaRBI.com

Fairfield High School is coming down the home stretch of the 2017 baseball season and heading into the postseason.

The Falcons hope to finish strong for head coach Keeton Zartman in his final campaign.

Zartman, a 2007 FHS graduate who is currently a math teacher at Fairfield, is changing jobs and getting married this summer.

The next man to lead the program is longtime high school assistant and junior high head coach Darin Kauffman. The 2005 Fairfield graduate was a left-handed pitcher for the Falcons.

Kauffman, a fifth grade teacher at West Noble Middle School who also coaches junior high boys basketball and has been a boys tennis assistant at Fairfield as well as keeping the scorebook for varsity and JV boys basketball, is anxious to get started. But he does not want to step on the toes of his friend and former teammate.

“I don’t want to disrespect (Zartman’s) program,” says Kauffman, who will continue to serve out his seventh season as junior varsity coach and be with the varsity when the JV is not in action. “I wish him the best on his new career and marriage. This is his team. We’re still focused on this year. We’re not done yet.”

Zartman, a former Falcon catcher who once helped Kauffman with the JV and later replaced Brodie Garber as head coach, made his intentions known at the start of this season. Then came the process of finding his replacement.

“It’s kind of weird timing,” says Kauffman, who met with athletic director Mark Hofer earlier in the spring and was approved for the new position by the school board last week. “But the board wasn’t going to meet again until June 8 and we’ve got summer camps coming up June 19-23.”

Kauffman played one season at Grace College before shoulder problems caused him to give up playing.

Garber, 1995 Fairfield graduate, approached Kauffman about coaching and he was on his staff for eight years before the Elkhart County Sports Hall of Famer and former Huntington University baseball and basketball player stepped down to concentrate on his head girls basketball coaching duties.

“I learned a lot from Brodie,” says Kauffman, who began coaching for him in the summer between his freshmen and sophomore years of college. “The biggest thing was (keeping up) team morale. He was good at getting guys to believe in what he was doing and we were very successful. He got kids to come out and play the game the right way and have fun while they were doing it.”

Fairfield has won six sectionals and one regional and all but one sectional came during Garber’s time as coach. The 2010 Falcons went 24-4 and lost to eventual state runner-up Delphi in the Class 2A Kokomo Semistate.

Kauffman says he is grateful he can still consult with Garber (who was in his first season as head baseball coach in Kauffman’s freshman year at Fairfield) and other Fairfield coaches and plans to keep that positive outlook in his role as head coach.

With his enthusiasm, Kauffman is hoping to attract some more talent back to the baseball program.

“We’re a couple of kids from getting to that next level, where we used to be,” says Kauffman. “We’re trying to get kids to play multiple sports and stick with it for all four years.”

Pierce Zent is Kauffman’s JV assistant in 2016-17 and plans call for him to be on Kauffman’s staff in 2017-18. Caleb Yoder has indicated an interest in coaching the JV.

“It’s hard in baseball to find a JV coach,” says Kauffman, noting that the JV plays away when the varsity is home and vice versa with just one diamond at Fairfield and many schools on the schedule. “The JV coach has got to be in charge of getting the field ready. He has to run his own practices. With most other sports, varsity and JV are together.”

Kauffman has already decided on the foundation of his program.

“We’ve got to increase our pitching depth for next year,” says Kauffman. “It all comes back to pitching and defense.

“If you can’t pitch and you can’t defend, you’re not going to win a sectional.”

Efficient mound work and strong defense is bound to keep pitch counts down and with the new rules governing pitch counts that’s more important than ever.

“The biggest factor (with pitch counts) is when are you going to play next?,” says Kauffman, who knows that a certain amount of pitches equates to a required number of days to rest. “One pitch can make a difference in a day.”

Here is the scale: 1 to 35 pitches (0 days); 36 to 60 (1 day); 61 to 80 (2 days); 81 to 100 (3 days); 101 to 120 (4 days).

As hitters, do you look to see more pitches just to rack up the count or stay aggressive?

Kauffman says the first pitch of an at-bat is often the most hittable one a batter will see.

“We’re going to take fastballs right down the middle and then we’re going to swing at sliders or curve balls that we can’t hit?,” says Kauffman.

Fairfield plays in the 12-team Northeast Corner Conference (with Angola, Central Noble, Churubusco, Eastside, Fremont, Garrett, Hamilton, Lakeland, Prairie Heights, West Noble and Westview) and is in the Class 3A NorthWood Sectional.

DARINKAUFFMAN

Darin Kauffman, a 2005 Fairfield High School graduate and longtime assistant coach, will be the Falcons’ head baseball coach for 2017-18.

Discipline, structure part of Nielsen’s Concord program

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By STEVE KRAH

http://www.IndianaRBI.com

Regimented and respectful.

Those are concepts Eric Nielsen is establishing in his second season as Concord High School head baseball coach.

“I’m very structured,” says Nielsen, who followed the retiring Jim Treadway as leader of the Minutemen. “All our practices are planned out. We have times and we stick to those times. Guys hustle everywhere they go. We’re very disciplined and are going to play the game the right way. I teach them to respect the game. There’s no trash talking at all. I’m big on body language.”

It’s taken some time, but players are starting to come around to Nielsen’s way of doing things.

“You are starting to see people buying into that,” says Nielsen. “They know what’s expected. Seniors will get on guys if they are not doing things the right way. That’s less that I have to do because that expectation is there.”

Nielsen was an all-state catcher at Elkhart Memorial High School, graduating in 2004. He went to be a regular behind the plate at Purdue University. His first high school head coaching stops came at Mt. Vernon (Fortville) and Knightstown before he moved back to north central Indiana.

Along the way, he has learned how to read his young athletes.

“I’ve learned really well how to manage the players,” says Nielsen. “I think that’s why (Chicago Cubs manager) Joe Maddon is so good at what he does. He’s not managing baseball, he’s managing people. In the olden days with (LaPorte coach) Ken Schreiber, it was this is the way it is and if you don’t like it ‘see ya!’ It was hard-nosed and it was tough.”

And while Nielsen considers himself a traditional, hard-nosed guy, he knows he has to motivate in a different way and keep his players engaged.

“If you know the game of baseball and you can build relationships, you’re going to be very successful, pending you have the talent,” says Nielsen. “I’ve seen teams that have the talent but they never go anywhere because they are so done with the season by the time the state tournament comes around. They’re cashed out.”

A syndrome that baseball and other spring sports face is a loss of focus because it’s the end of the school year. For 12th graders, they call it “senioritis.” But other grades — and even coaches — can get it, too.

Nielsen insists on holding out a carrot for his players.

“You’ve got to have them chasing something,” says Nielsen. “If you don’t, they’re going let up.

“How do you intrinisically motivate the player to want to compete? I tell them to get caught up in the process, don’t get caught up in the results.

“If I can get the process important to them then the results will come. If the process is not important to them, they don’t want to compete and there’s no reason for them to put in everything they have, you’re going to get that apathy.”

Nielsen looks at his 2017 team and sees pitching depth. At least nine of 12 varsity players can take the mound.

“The hard part is finding out who is my No. 1 and No. 2, who’s my best reliever,” says Nielsen. “We’re still in the process of finding that out.”

Along with pitching coach Mike McGregor, Nielsen looks at pitchers not only in terms of physical talent but what’s happening between the ears.

“We’re trying to teach mental toughness on the mound,” says Nielsen. “If we can have guys that will compete, saying ‘I’m going to strike this guy out.’ Even if they don’t, they are going to distinguish themselves from the rest of the players.”

What about the new pitch count rule?

“I thought it was going to be a bigger issue than it has been,” says Nielsen. “I traditionally don’t have guys throw that much anyway. I don’t push the 120 spot. As long as they’re under 80, I know how many days they need off.

“I thought I’d be juggling a lot. It hasn’t been too bad.”

Nielsen said the pitch count rule will likely be more of an issue during the IHSAA tournament series than the regular season.

“People are going to watch that really close,” says Nielsen.

Concord spends plenty of time at its regimented practices on “small ball.” The Minutemen work on moving runners with the bunt.

“We don’t have anybody on the team we can rely on to hit the long ball yet,” says Nielsen.

Something that Nielsen established in his first season at Concord was an Armed Forces Day (Concord Baseball Armed Forces Day on Facebook). It was such a hit, the Minutemen will be pay tribute to those who have served Saturday, May 6 when South Bend Adams visits for a 10 a.m. game.

Father Scott Nielsen (Army during Vietnam era) and grandfather Bob Burns (Air Force during World War II) and assistant coach Jason Paulson (Marines) are all people close to Nielsen with military ties.

As a social studies teacher at CHS, he also gets a chance to tell students about the importance of the military.

“It’s good to show the kids what these guys are doing day in and day out for our country and show them appreciation for the sacrifices that they make and have made for our freedom,” says Nielsen, whose other assistants are Sean Sears and Nic Minder.

The Minutemen compete in the Northern Lakes Conference (along with Elkhart Memorial, Goshen, Northridge, NorthWood, Plymouth, Warsaw and Wawasee). The double round robin NLC race began this week.

ERICNIELSEN2

Eric Nielsen, a 2004 Elkhart Memorial High School graduate, is in his second season as head baseball coach at Concord High School. He was a catcher at Purdue University.