Tag Archives: National Federation of State High School Associations

Northridge players get on new turf for first time

BY STEVE KRAH

http://www.IndianaRBI.com

Andrew Brabender keeps finding reasons to be grateful for Northridge High School’s new baseball field.

“No corners were cut,” says Brabender, who led players through their first fall workout on the new turf surface in Middelbury, Ind., Monday, Sept. 14. 

Around two dozen athletes not participating in fall sports went through drills, getting used to how the ball bounces.

“Fall will be about practicing and seeing how it plays,” says Brabender. “Outfielders will have to move and keep (the ball) in front of them. Infielders will have to have arms (because there is much more foul territory than at the previous varsity field.”

Brabender notes that the backstop is about 60 feet from home plate.

Dimensions of the new field are 320 feet down the foul lines and 370 to center field. 

Suspecting that the National Federation of State High School Associations is likely to put in a rule about making all outfield fences a minimum of eight feet high, Northridge made its fences that high with the batter’s eye in center at 20 feet. 

There is an inning-by-inning scoreboard in left field and the sound system goes through it.

Padding and other fittings are to be installed in the dugouts. Windscreens and yellow piping will be added to the fences later.

The press box is spacious.

There is bleaching seating for about 350 fans and the space to bring in more when Northern Lakes Conference member Northridge hosts an IHSAA Class 4A sectional tournament next spring.

There are two full batting tunnels behind the Raider dugout on the third base side.

While not used Monday, the lights will be concentrated on the field.

Brabender had input in the facility and suggested that a large “N” in the program’s preferred font be placed in center field. He got the idea from the University of Michigan

The adjacent softball field also has an “N” in center.

The football field, which played host to its first varsity contest Friday, Sept. 11, also an “N” at the 50-yard line. 

Baseball, softball, football and track share the same complex, located right across the road from the high school. Interra Credit Union has the naming rights.

Construction continued through the summer even with the COVID-19 pandemic.

With the field being closer, time can be saved when starting practices or on gamedays. 

Before, players had to get up the hill during dismissal traffic and that took at least 15 minutes.

“In-season, that’s a lot,” says Brabender. “Now we can start right at 4.

“We can go 90 minutes and have the same production (as a longer practice).”

The block house next to the fields has a locker room and a multi-purpose room with Promethean board that will allow for team talks or meals between games of a doubleheader.

By having two fields, the Raiders can conduct two practices or have two games at the same time. This will allow them to have a freshmen or C-team — something that previously was not practical.

“There are so many things I’m going to continue to find that’s going to be awesome,” says Brabender, who plans to run workouts on Mondays and Wednesdays on the field through the fall.

Turf fields are trending on Indiana high school campuses. There are no less than a dozen of them. LEARN MORE HERE.

Northridge High School baseball in Middlebury, Ind., rung in the turf era Monday, Sept. 14 with the first workout. (Steve Krah Photo)
A view from the press box of the new turf baseball field that is part of the Interra Credit Union athletic complex at Northridge High School in Middlebury, Ind. (Steve Krah Photo)
The scoreboard in left field at the new Northridge High School baseball field in Middlebury, Ind. (Steve Krah Photo)
Players run along the outfield warning track at the new Northridge High School baseball field in Middlebury, Ind., on Sept. 14, 2020. (Steve Krah Photo)
The first day of baseball workouts on the new field at Northridge High School in Middlebury, Ind., included groundball drills led by head coach Andrew Brabender. (Steve Krah Photo)
Head coach Andrew Brabender talks to players at the first workout on the new Northridge High School baseball field in Middelbury, Ind., Sept. 14, 2020. (Steve Krah Photo)
Batting tunnels are behind the home third base dugout at the new Northridge High School baseball field in Middlebury, Ind. (Steve Krah Photo)
The view from the mound shows the stands and press box at the new Northridge High School baseball field in Middlebury, Ind. (Steve Krah Photo)

IHSAA addresses IHSBCA proposals, rules changes

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By STEVE KRAH

http://www.IndianaRBI.com

Two Indiana High School Baseball Coaches Association proposals were approved by the Indiana High School Athletic Association.

Two proposals were rejected.

One was tabled.

Several rules and points of emphasis were discussed.

This all happened late last week and was announced at the IHSBCA State Clinic in Indianapolis. IHSAA assistant commissioner Robert Faulkens was there to answer questions and provide information for the coaches.

The first proposal was to allow catch during conditioning (which can be done six days a week). The IHSBCA withdrew that proposal and it was tabled. Faulkens still presented it to the IHSAA executive board. The board directed him to re-write the proposal.

“Effective with the 2021 season, playing catch will be in conditioning and not Limited Contact,” said Faulkens.

“Playing catch during conditioning, what does that looks like?,” said Shane Edwards, an IHSBCA executive council member and head coach at Oak Hill High School. “It’s 1 v 1. There’s no catching gear and no mound.”

The second proposal was to add a third day to the Limited Contact Period (two days a week for a maximum of two hours) after Week 33 of the IHSAA calendar and that extra day could be used for bullpen sessions. The proposal was rejected 19-0.

The third proposal was to add a week to the end of the baseball season. The proposal was rejected 19-0.

The fourth proposal was to provide for 10 activity days during the summer for school baseball teams. The proposal was approved 19-0.

Within those 10 days, there can be eight contest days and more than one game can be played on those days. IHSAA Moratorium Week rules still apply.

The fifth proposal was to add a person to track to track the pitch count rule (1 to 35 pitches requires 0 days rest; 36 to 60 requires 1 day; 61 to 80 requires 2 days; 81 to 100 requires 3 days; and 101 to 120 requires 4 days) during the IHSAA tournament. Beyond that, the tracker would be able to notify game officials that a pitcher needs to come out when they reach their pitch count limit. The proposal was approved 15-4. The host site is responsible for hiring the pitch counter at all levels of the tournament.

To be clear, the same person who keeps the scorebook can be the pitch counter.

Indiana high school baseball teams are currently in a Limited Contact Period.

Practice starts March 16. The first contest date is March 30.

IHSAA sectionals begin May 27. The calendar rolls this year so games are not played on Memorial Day (May 25).

Faulkens asked coaches to take seriously the grading of umpires for the state tournament series. Voting opens April 13 and closes April 27.

“The rating system for umpires is so tight that one or two votes can impact whether we’re getting our best officials, our best umpires at the regional, semistate, state level,” said Faulkens. “Take some time and honestly and earnestly evaluate our umpires. Take the emotion out of it.

“It makes my job difficult when I know who my best guys are and they can’t advance one or two bad votes. Half of their rating comes from your vote.”

Faulkens noted that the National Federation of State High School Associations requires that varsity baseballs plus chest protectors and body suit used during the 2020 season must carry the NOSCAE (National Operating Committee for Athletic Equipment) seal.

This year, there will be an expanded designated hitter rule to allow a player to be used as a position player and a DH. This will allow for more lineup flexibility.

Faulkens said a point of emphasis in 2020 is for players to stay in their dugout unless they are the on-deck hitter.

In addition, the National Federation says video technology can be used in teaching and coaching. But it has to be used appropriately.

“Last year, we saw a team video-taping a pitcher from behind the backstop,” said Faulkens. “You can’t do it.”

Faulkens also addressed ejections.

“There are way too many coaches getting kicked out of baseball games,” said Faulkens. “If there’s one, it’s too many.

“Baseball coaches had more people kicked out of games last year than any sport. That’s unacceptable.

“We are an education-based entity. We are supposed to be teaching through sport. If it’s unacceptable in your classroom, it’s should be unacceptable on the diamond.”

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Varsity baseballs plus chest protectors and body suit used during the 2020 Indiana high school baseball season must carry the NOSCAE (National Operating Committee for Athletic Equipment) seal. (Steve Krah Photo)

North All-Stars coach Turner simply enjoys teaching the game of baseball

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By STEVE KRAH

http://www.IndianaRBI.com

Terry Turner loves to be around the people who love baseball.

That’s what draws him to the sport and to coaching — the last two seasons as head coach at Daleville High School after 29 at Anderson High School (25 as head coach).

“It’s that camaraderie that I love about the game,” says Turner. “At Daleville, the kids believe what the coaching staff is teaching. They eat it up. They have a passion for the game also.

“I just have fun with the kids.”

In his two springs leading the Broncos, those receptive young athletes have won two IHSAA sectionals (2016 at Daleville and 2017 at Anderson Prep) and the program’s first regional (at Carroll of Flora), semistate (at Plymouth) and state championship in 2016.

The Broncos carted home the 2016 1A state trophy after topping Lanesville 4-0.

In 2017, Daleville lost to eventual 1A state runner-up Rossville in the semifinals of the Carroll (Flora) Regional.

Anderson has won seven baseball sectionals — four came on Turner’s watch (1987, 1988, 1992, 2012). His Indians took a regional crown in 1995 with North Central Conference titles in 1999, 2000 and 2004.

After serving as an all-star assistant coach in 2009 when Anderson player Nolan Earley was on the roster, Turner has been named North head coach for the 2017 Indiana High School Baseball Coaches Association North/South All-Star Series, which will stage its practice, junior showcase at banquet Friday, July 14, two games Saturday, July 15, and one game Sunday, July 16, at Ball State University in Muncie.

Turner will be joined at his alma mater (he earned both bachelor’s and master’s degrees at BSU) by Daleville assistant Wally Winans.

“You’re never going to find a better teacher of the game of baseball than that guy,” says Turner. “I turn my infield over to him with one drill after the other. I just get out of his way.”

Fundamentals are the foundation of Turner’s coaching.

Turner and his Daleville assistants, including Winans, Tom Lyday and Terry Scheetz talk constantly to their players about every scenario they can conjure. If a weakness is found in a game, the Broncos will concentrate on that at their next practice.

Daleville, which is a member of the Mid-East Conference (along with Blue River Valley, Cowan, Eastern Hancock, Monroe Central, Randolph Southern, Shenandoah, Union of Modoc, Wapahani and Wes-Del), tests itself by playing mostly larger schools.

Turner’s all-star staff will also include Todd Farr (Eastbrook) and John Steinhilber (Hebron).

Broncos outfielder Corbin Maddox is on the North team. Daleville’s Elliott Jackson was an all-star in 2016.

While at Anderson, Turner also sent Rod Mills (1987), Jeremy Quire (1993), Jordan Czarniecki (1999), Kurt Minnick (2000), Roy Erle (2001), Mike Earley (2006) and Zach Bucci (2011) to the all-star series.

One big difference between coaching at Anderson and Daleville is the size of the schools. Enrollment for 2016-17 was reported at 281.

As a smaller school, Daleville also shares athletes among its team. Turner says it’s not unusual for a wrestler to come from practice and take a few swings with the bat.

“The challenge is the numbers,” says Turner. “We don’t have as many pitchers as the larger schools would. The pitch count rule (1 to 35 pitches requires 0 days rest; 36 to 60 requires 1 day; 61 to 80 requires 2 days; 81 to 100 requires 3 days; and 101 to 120 requires 4 days) has hurt the small school.”

In 2016, Lanesville’s Brenden Bube tossed 137 pitches in the semistate championship game. That would not have been allowed in 2017.

Turner, who graduated from Laurel High School (now part of the Franklin County consolidation) in 1975 and played baseball for Lynn Sheets.

After college, Turner was a junior high basketball and assistant baseball coach to Indiana Basketball Hall of Famer Basil Mawbey and IHSBCA Hall of Famer Tom Gable at Connersville High School. He remembers a piece of advice early in his days at Anderson, which began in 1986-87.

“I had no pitchers,” says Turner. “(Gable) told me, ‘everybody is a pitcher.’ He would say to his players, ‘you are a pitcher until you prove to me you can’t.’”

Turner had adopted similar approach.

“You can never have too many pitchers,” says Turner. “At the high school level — really, at all levels — it’s all about throwing strikes. If you don’t throw strikes, you’re in trouble.”

Throwing too many outside the zone also tends to have a negative effect on defenders.

“Infielders get back on their heels,” says Turner. “You put runners on and it puts all this pressure on your defense. Now they have to make the play.”

With a limited number of pitches to work with, Turner is not as quick to have his pitchers work around the zone when they get an 0-2 count.

“The pitch count changes the whole way you’re going to coach the game,” says Turner.

When it really comes into play is the sectional when single-elimination games are played in a short period of time and coaches may not have pitchers available for long — or at all — if those hurlers have thrown too many pitches prior to the next game.

“The (National) Federation is trying to protect young kids and their arms and I get that,” says Turner. “We’re all in the same boat. At tournament time, it’s not a fair situation. I don’t know what the answer is.”

After Connersville, Turner spent 1985-86 at Jasper, where he coached junior high basketball and was a baseball assistant to IHSBCA Hall of Famer Ray Howard.

At Anderson, Turner also was a boys basketball assistant for 14 seasons under Hall of Famer Norm Held and then Ron Heclinski.

Turner is still a teacher at Anderson. Formerly a physical science instructor, he now instructs on health and physical education.

Terry and Debbie Turner have three children — Derrick (32), Christa (27) and Jackie (23). All three were athletes at Pendleton Heights High School.

DALEVILLEBRONCOS

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Terry Turner just completed his second season as head baseball coach at Daleville High School after 29 seasons (25 as head coach) at Anderson High School. He is head coach for the North in the Indiana High School Baseball Coaches Association North/South All-Star Series July 14-16 in Muncie.