Tag Archives: Cincinnati Steam

Contributing to team success is driving force for U. of Cincinnati’s Cross

BY STEVE KRAH
http://www.IndianaRBI.com

Kerrington Cross produced strong numbers the first chance he got to play collegiate baseball.
After not seeing action for the University of Cincinnati in 2021, Cross played in 52 games (50 starts) and hit .291 (57-of-196) with nine home runs, five triples, nine doubles, 30 runs batted in, 44 runs scored and 17 stolen bases in 2022.
The 2020 Brownsburg (Ind.) High School graduate led the American Athletic Conference in three-baggers and his team in bases pilfered.
In the last game of the 2022 season, Bearcats head coach Scott Googins started Cross at third base and in the lead-off spot in the batting order. The 6-foot, 200-pound athlete began the campaign at second base and hit from many different slots throughout the spring.
The coach holds his players accountable.
“(Googins) likes really gritty players and talks about us being a brotherhood,” says Cross. “He pushes us. He likes people to grow from their failures.”
Cross, 20, enjoyed a productive season with the 2021 Great Summer League Collegiate League’s Cincinnati Steam where the righty swinger wielded a wood bat and hit .419 (52-of-124), four homers, 23 RBIs, 31 runs and 14 steals.
But stats or any of the five tools of baseball are not what drives Cross.
“I’d rather not think about that,” says Cross. “What does this team need? That’s what I’m focused on.
“I apply myself to the team more than thinking about my skill set.”
Helping him hone his skills and more is Cincinnati assistant Kyle Sprague, who guides baserunners, hitters and infielders.
“He’s at the field three hours longer than the players setting up all the drills,” says Cross of Sprague. “He puts his heart and soul into the game.
“I have a weird class schedule so we’ve done a lot of 1-on-1.”
As a student in UC’s five-year Chemical Engineering program, Cross revolves class work with cooperatives. He is getting practical experience on a co-op this summer.
He played in seven games for the 2022 Steam, but the schedule of working from 7:30 to 4 p.m. and then “show and go” every game was not helping him.
“I decided to develop on my own,” says Cross.
Looking at his best athletic qualities, Cross cites brainpower.
“On the field, it’s my I.Q.,” says Cross. “It ties into my major. I’m considered a nerd, I guess. In high school, I was really good with numbers, really good at science and had a good memory.”
To put even more in his tool box, Cross plans to add a Master of Business Administration (MBA) to his resume.
Born in Honolulu, Cross moved to Brownsburg about the time he was starting school.
He played at Brownsburg Little League and then went to travel ball with the Indiana Bulls from 13U to 17U.
Denied a senior high school season in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic, Cross went with the Westfield, Ind.-based College Summer League at Grand Park’s A-Team before going to Cincinnati.
In three years of varsity seasons for the Brownsburg Bulldogs, Cross played one year for head coach Eric Mattingly and two for Dan Roman.
“Both are great guys,” says Cross. “Mattingly gave me an opportunity. He opened my eyes that I could take it to a new level.
“Roman pushed me to be better. He knew I had the potential. We bonded about more than just baseball and stay in-touch. He’s a really good friend of mine.”
Kerrington has an older brother (Kasey) and sister (Clarice). Their parents are Harold and Miki Cross. He is from Illinois and she from Japan. They met in Hawaii. Harold Cross runs a Hometown Mini Donuts cart and Miki Cross is a translator (English to Japanese and vice versa).

Kerrington Cross (University of Cincinnati Photo)
Kerrington Cross (University of Cincinnati Photo)

Kerrington Cross (University of Cincinnati Image)
Kerrington Cross (University of Cincinnati Photo)
Kerrington Cross (University of Cincinnati Image)
Kerrington Cross (University of Cincinnati Photo)

Miranda expanding broadcast experience with Richmond Jazz

RBILOGOSMALL copy

By STEVE KRAH

http://www.IndianaRBI.com

The 2018 Great Lakes Summer Collegiate League baseball season begins tonight (June 8) for the Richmond Jazz.

Providing play-by-play for the the 7:05 p.m. road contest against the Cincinnati Steam will be intern Dominic Miranda on Facebook Live.

Miranda, a 2015 graduate of NorthWood High School in Nappanee, Ind., is heading into his senior year at DePauw University in Greencastle, Ind. He is a communication major with a focus in broadcast journalism.

During his college career, Miranda has been involved in sports talk radio, television anchoring, podcasting and newspaper writing.

“I thought I’d round it out with some really good play-by-play experience,” says Miranda. “The Jazz gives interns a lot of responsibility. It’s been really great so far.”

Miranda will call the action for 20 Jazz away games and act as public address announcer for 20 home games at Don McBride Stadium.

With title of Director of Game Day Relations, he will also be doing pre- and post-game interviews and helping the team with its social media presence.

The Jazz, with Deanna Beaman as partner/general manager, were division champions in 2017 and Richmond has a long history of hosting college or professional baseball teams.

“It’s a really tight-knit community,” says Miranda.

As a play-by-play announcer, he knows that preparation is key.

“Failure to prepare is preparing to fail,” says Miranda. “I’m getting to know the players and their backgrounds — anything I can pull from in my preparation to liven up the broadcast.

“You are the listeners’ ears and eyes on radio. You give them count, tell them if there are runners on base, the score and what they did in previous at-bats. You keep them engaged in the game. You remind them of a momentum shift

“Baseball is different. There is so much going on. I have a good understanding of baseball. I wanted to translate that into a good, solid broadcast.”

In the spring, Miranda went to Atlanta for an internship with CNN. He got to work with sports contributor and Super Bowl XL MVP Hines Ward.

“I came in early with anchors for a month,” says Miranda. “I got created my own (TV) reel and riot shaped what I’m looking for.

“I thought I was sold on radio. But I’m certainly not after that experience.”

Last summer, Miranda did an internship for marketing start-up Exquisite Conglomerate Communications and hosted two 30-minute sports podcast segments per week. With ECC promoting it, he got up to 10,000 to 12,000 listeners each week.

“They gave me free rein to do what I wanted and execute it,” says Miranda, who was tied to the Chicago office of the North Carolina-based company. “I was able to get sponsorships from businesses in northern Indiana and get marketing experience.

“I was finding out how can I be my own brand and put my own spin on it.”

Miranda says podcasting is the hot trend in media.

“That’s how you get your content out there,” says Miranda. “I plan on continuing that.”

He plans to get his podcast on the iTunes platform.

What’s his advice for successful podcasting?

“Take about things you care about, get good guests and have good conversation,” says Miranda. “Do something you’re passionate about and the rest will really fall into place.”

At school, he has been assistant sports director and hosted a talk show and done play-by-play on WGRE, worked at D3TV, helped the the school’s athletic communications department and written option pieces for The DePauw — Indiana’s oldest college newspaper.

“It’s a good mix,” says Miranda, who is planning to graduate in the spring of 2019.

Dominic, the middle son of Martin and Angie Miranda, grew up with a passion for athletics as did older brother Tony and younger brother Vincent.

“We played sports our entire lives,” says Dominic, who played baseball with his younger brother at NorthWood and is heading into his last season as a outside linebacker on the DePauw football team. He missed the 2017 season with an ACL injury.

Tony Miranda played football at Trine University in Angola, Ind., and now salesman and manager of client services for Learfield Communications/Indiana University Sports Properties.

Vincent Miranda was a freshman on the men’s basketball team at Taylor University in Upland, Ind., in 2017-18 and is a biochemistry major.

DOMINICMIRANDA

Dominic Miranda, who is heading into his senior year at DePauw University in Greencastle, Ind., is an intern this summer with the Richmond Jazz of the Great Lakes Summer Collegiate League. The NorthWood High School graduate will be doing several things for the baseball team, including play-by-play.

 

Baseball in Richmond played to the tune of Jazz

rbilogosmall

By STEVE KRAH

http://www.IndianaRBI.com

Richmond, Ind., has long appreciated the crack of the baseball bat.

The Rose City fielded professional teams throughout most of the first half of the 20th century and brought pro ball back with the independent Frontier League’s Richmond Roosters (1995-2005).

Charles Weeghman, the man who built what would become known as Wrigley Field, was born in Richmond in 1874.

These days, the crack comes in the Great Lakes Summer Collegiate League with the Richmond Jazz.

Playing at John Cate Field at Don McBride Stadium (which dates back to 1936), the Jazz came into the league in 2016. The Richmond RiverRats played collegiate wood-bat baseball in the Prospect League. That team sold and moved to Lafayette, Ind. The GLSCL approached Richmond about joining and a new baseball brand came to town.

Richmond native Deanna Beaman has been a part of the Roosters, RiverRats and Jazz.

A 1996 Richmond High School graduate with a sports management and marketing degree from Indiana University, Beaman served as an intern with the Roosters and served in several capacities with the club for eight seasons.

When the Roosters sold and moved to Traverse City, Mich., to become the Beach Bums of the Frontier League beginning with the 2006 season, it left a baseball void in Richmond.

The hole was filled with changing from pro to college ball and joining the new Prospect League for the summer of 2009 for what turned out to be a seven-season run.

“The college wood bat model is better in this market,” says Beaman.

Then with expansion, costs began to rise in the collegiate summer league world.

“The Prospect League grew and is became more and more expensive to be in that league,” says Beaman, who estimates the team was spending $40,000 per season on travel, not including hotels. “The Great Lakes League approached us. We found that the business models are different in the two leagues.

“There was an interest to keep baseball in the community. You have to be a 501 (c) 3 (non-profit organization) to be in the (GLSCL).”

Beaman is president and general manager of Hitters Hangout Sports Foundation, which operates as the Richmond Jazz.

Richmond players are charged a participation fee (similar to travel baseball) and the club pays a frranchise fee to the league, which must abide by NCAA regulations.

She identifies the top benefits of Great Lakes membership for Richmond is the short season (the team plays a 42-game regular season) and travel is relatively short with no overnight trips.

Richmond is in the GLSCL’s Southern Division with Ohio teams Cincinnati, Hamilton, Southern Ohio and Xenia.

The Central Division features five Ohio teams — Galion, Grand Lake, Licking County, Lorain County and Lima.

Making up the Northern Division are Grand River, Irish Hills, Lake Erie and Muskegon in Michigan and Saint Clair in Ontario, Canada.

Richmond would not see Northern teams until the playoffs.

There were growing pains with the transition from to the Great Lakes. Richmond got a new mayor and park superintendent and the baseball team got a new lease at McBride Stadium in 2016. On the field, Matt Brankle managed the Jazz to a record of 12-29.

Things were completely revamped on the baseball side for the 2017 season. Floridians Brett “Buster” Schneider (assistant coach at NCAA Division I Florida Atlantic University) and Brian Thomas (coach at Gainesville High School) were recruited to be head coach and pitching coach, respectively, and former RiverRats players Joe Pourier was named as a volunteer assistant.

“We have to get a winning ball club in the community,” says Beaman. “Buster has been a great addition for us — both on and off the field. He’s changed some lives in our community. If you want to play at the D-I level, he can tell you what it takes.”

Schneider came to Richmond through a connection Beaman made with a former player.

Jeremiah Klosterman was a catcher on back-to-back Frontier League championship teams in Richmond in 2001 and 2002. The former Florida State University standout owns Hard Knoxx Baseball Academy in Jacksonville, Fla., and Schneider was one of his instructors.

Schneider is in his first season as a summer collegiate head coach, but he did serve three seasons as an assistant for Green Bay of the Northwoods League.

Hitting the ground running (leaving Florida June 2 and beginning practice June 4), Schneider immediately began working on team chemistry with a roster made up of players with hometowns in eight different states. Some players live close enough to commute for games and workouts while others stay with host families.

“You have to get them to buy into your system and play for a chgampionship,” says Schneider. “You have to have a plan in place and you have to win early (with such a short season).”

Through their connections, Beaman and Schneider helped form a Jazz roster that includes players with hometowns in eight states.

“You reach out and get as many good, quality players as you can,” says Schneider. “I want them to use the summer to get better and go back and be conference players of the year and All-Americans.”

By rule, league members must carry a certain number of Division I players in order to be funded by Major League Baseball for developmental reasons. There are numerous collegiate wood bat leagues across the country.

This summer, Richmond has pitchers James Meyer (Valparaiso), Ben Nelson (Virginia Commonwealth) and R.J. Wagner (Dayton), catchers Chase DeBonis (Bethune-Cookman) and Jordan Stacy (Bethune-Cookman), infielder Jordan Gillerman (St. John’s) and outfielders Jack Holden (Eastern Illinois) and Cole Parks (Bethune-Cookman).

“We can get hitters all day long,” says Beaman. “Pitching is the issue. D-I coaches are protecting their starters (and often shutting them down for the summer).

“Across the league, bullpens are very thin. Sometimes we have to go ‘Mississippi State style 3-3-3’ to finish a game.”

Says Thomas, “We’ve done pretty well with the guys we’ve received … We try to keep their pitch counts down … I try to get to know everyone at a personal level.”

GLSCL rules do not allow for a disabled list and player can’t be released based on talent or performance. That means the roster is pretty steady throughout the season.

RICHMONDJAZZ